Latest release of world’s most popular Open Source backup solution includes powerful new capabilities for large data centers

Lausanne, Switzerland 7 July, 2017 – The Bacula open source project today announced its release of version 9.0 of the popular Bacula backup and recovery software, an advanced and highly scalable backup and restore solution for small, medium and large businesses. Bacula community version is available at no cost and is used by companies all over the world as their principle data backup and recovery solution. Version 9 adds new features, optimizes performance, and offers improved ease-of-use.

Some of the key new features in the project’s release are:
– Maximum Virtual Full Interval Option
– Progressive Virtual Full
– New Console ACL Directives
– Client Initiated Backup, including configuration tools
– Communication Line Compression
– Tray Monitor
– Deduplication Optimized Volumes
– Tape Alert Enhancements

Bacula is the base and fully open source version of its more broadly-featured version, Bacula Enterprise Edition. “Bacula is the most popular open source backup solution in the world, with over three million downloads. At the request of our huge community of users, this release brings exciting new features that are aimed at helping the IT professional. This is one of the biggest releases we have ever made”, said Kern Sibbald, founder and owner of the project.

About Bacula:
The Bacula open source project is a set of computer programs that permits the system administrator to manage backup, recovery, and verification of computer data across a network of computers of different kinds. Bacula can also run entirely upon a single computer and can backup to various types of media, including tape and disk.

In technical terms, Bacula is a network Client/Server based backup program. Bacula is both relatively easy to use and efficient, while offering many advanced storage management features that make it easy to find and recover lost or damaged files. Due to its modular design, Bacula is scalable from small single computer systems to systems consisting of hundreds of computers located over a large network.

Contact:
Rob Morrison
Email: communications@baculasystems.com
www.baculasystems.com